Workshop: PENDULUM 3 (Japanese music)

KYOTO CITY UNIVERSITY OF ARTS

RESEARCH CENTRE FOR TRADITIONAL JAPANESE MUSIC

PENDULUM 3

邦楽 HŌGAKU @ KYOTO GEIDAI 京都芸大

AN INTENSIVE THREE-DAY COURSE IN JAPANESE MUSIC

AUGUST 15-17, 2017

This three-day intensive course in Japanese music PENDULUM 3 is being offered for the third time in August 2017.

The course introduces many of the genres of traditional Japanese music that have been transmitted to the present and are still actively performed. We discuss the varied ways of experiencing musical modernity in the context of the overwhelming dominance of western music in Japan. The course provides an accessible overview of Japanese music culture for non-Japanese participants, including performers, composers and musicologists. It is also open to Japanese participants who are interested in an international perspective on Japanese music.

The genres to be covered include gagaku, shōmyō, and shakuhachi and koto music. The narrative genres of heike and jōruri and their place in the nō, bunraku and kabuki theatres are introduced. Participants have hand-on encounter with a choice of koto, shamisen, shakuhachi or utai (noh singing) during practical learning sessions. Guest performers will contribute mini-recitals as an adjunct to the lectures.

 

Location:        Kyoto City University of Arts

Schedule:      Morning session 10:00-13:00   Afternoon session 14:00-17:00

Cost:                 10,000 yen

Lecturer and convenor: Alison Tokita, Director, Research Centre for Japanese Traditional Music, with guest lecturers to be confirmed

HOW TO APPLY

Registrations will be received by Friday July 14, 2017 through the following website:

http://w3.kcua.ac.jp/jtm/pendulum3.html

Payment will be made in cash on the first day of the course, between 9:00 and 10:00.

Unfortunately, we are not able to provide accommodation assistance.

Enquiries can be made to the course convenor, Alison Tokita: tokita@kcua.ac.jp

Advertisements

About Paula

Paula lives in the vortex of graduate life. She studies medieval Japanese history.
This entry was posted in announcements, culture and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s