Funding: Japan-US Friendship Commission Fellowships

The Fellowship Program for Advanced Social Science Research on Japan is a joint activity of the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission (JUSFC) and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Awards support research on modern Japanese society and political economy, Japan’s international relations, and U.S.-Japan relations. The program encourages innovative research that puts these subjects in wider regional and global contexts and is comparative and contemporary in nature. Research should contribute to scholarly knowledge or to the general public’s understanding of issues of concern to Japan and the United States. Appropriate disciplines for the research include anthropology, economics, geography, history, international relations, linguistics, political science, psychology, and sociology. Awards usually result in articles, monographs, books, digital materials, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources.

In keeping with the JUSFC’s commitment to foster the next generation of leaders in developing and maintaining the Japan-U.S. relationship, NEH encourages applications to this program from junior scholars (that is, scholars who have earned their terminal degree within the last seven years).  Scholars at any career stage are, however, eligible to apply.

The fellowships are designed for researchers with advanced Japanese language skills whose research will require use of data, sources, documents, onsite interviews, or other direct contact in Japanese. Fellows may undertake their projects in Japan, the United States, or both, and may include work in other countries for comparative purposes. Projects may be at any stage of development. The fellowships provide $5000 per month, for 6-12 months of full-time work. Eligibility is limited to a) U.S. citizens and b) non-citizens who have lived in the U.S. for at least the three-year period immediately preceding the application deadline.

Application Deadline: April 24, 2019 (for projects beginning between 2/1/20 and 9/1/21)

Additional information and materials (including samples of successful applications) are available at: http://www.neh.gov/grants/research/fellowships-advanced-social-science-research-japan

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Call for Applications: Japanese Summer School at SOAS

DURATION:    2 weeks or 4 weeks

TUITION FEE:  £1,150 (10% discount if you apply by 31 March)

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

  • A university student or a graduate at the time of attending the summer school, and 18+ years of age. Professional experience can be acknowledged as equivalent to a university qualification.

FEATURED EVENTS

  • Overview
  • Structure
  • Teaching and Learning
  • Fees and funding
  • Apply

Venue: Russell Square: College Buildings

Start of programme: Summer 2019

Mode of Attendance: Full-time

Programme Description

Learning a language enables you to communicate; it gives direct access to foreign-language sources. Learning a language opens up a world of possibilities for dialogue, understanding, personal development and careers: languages set you free.

Choose to learn Chinese Mandarin at level 1a (Beginner) or level 1b (Advanced Beginner), or combine both levels over 4 weeks.

Japanese Level 1a (Beginner)
1 – 12 July 2019

This is a basic introductory language course in the written and spoken language for absolute beginners and is equivalent to the first term of Japanese language study at university. Students are not assumed to have any previous knowledge of the language or its script.

The course covers several basic constructions of the language, enabling students to acquire basic skills in reading, writing, comprehension and speaking. Successful students will gain the ability to read and write short simple texts, and communicate on simple everyday topics. Emphasis will be placed on good pronunciation and on the social and linguistic conventions of everyday conversation.

On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Gain knowledge and understanding of basic grammar
  • Gain knowledge and understanding of essential vocabulary
  • Gain knowledge and understanding of the appropriateness of basic structures and expressions in a given context
  • Demonstrate the ability to understand sentences and short passages in written language on certain everyday topics
  • Demonstrate the ability to produce sentences in written language on certain everyday topics
  • Demonstrate the ability to produce sentences in spoken language on certain everyday topics
  • Demonstrate the ability to understand spoken sentences on certain everyday topics
Japanese Level 1b (Advanced Beginner)
15 – 26 July 2019

This is a basic language acquisition course for students who want to build on the essential skills acquired in Level 1a, or who have equivalent existing knowledge and want to develop their skills. This course is equivalent to the second term of Japanese language study at university and students are therefore assumed to have some basic knowledge of the language or its script.

Students will develop their knowledge of some of the several basic constructions of the language, enabling them to advance their skills in reading, writing, comprehension and speaking. Successful students will gain the ability to read and write simple texts, and communicate on everyday topics. Emphasis will be placed on good pronunciation and on the social and linguistic conventions of everyday conversation.

On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Gain knowledge and understanding of commonly used grammar.
  • Gain knowledge and understanding of vocabulary related to a range of everyday topics.
  • Gain greater knowledge and understanding of the appropriateness of basic structures and expressions in a given context.
  • Demonstrate the ability to understand passages in written language on everyday topics.
  • Demonstrate the ability to produce short passages in written language on everyday topics.
  • Demonstrate the ability to understand spoken sentences and short passages on everyday topics.
  • Demonstrate the ability to engage in short spoken discourse on everyday topics.

Assessment

Assessment for each course will be a test at the end of the first week of 40 minutes duration (30%) and at the end of the second week of 60 minutes duration (70%)

15 SOAS credits

These are level 4 courses (equivelent to first year undergraduate). Each two-week language module is worth 15 credits in the UK system. 15 credits is normally equivalent to 4 credits in the US system and 7.5 ECTS in the European system.

If you intend to transfer credit to your home institution, please check the requirements with them before you apply. We will be happy to assist you in any way we can, however please be aware that the decision to transfer credit rests with your home institution.

Enquiries

For more information, please fill out our enquiries form.

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Book Announcement: Uneven Moments: Reflections on Japan’s Modern History

Uneven Moments
Reflections on Japan’s Modern History

Harry Harootunian
Columbia University Press

Few scholars have done more than Harry Harootunian to shape the study of modern Japan. Incorporating Marxist critical perspectives on history and theoretically informed insights, his scholarship has been vitally important for the world of Asian studies. Uneven Moments presents a selection of Harootunian’s essays on Japan’s intellectual and cultural history from the late Tokugawa period to the present that span the many phases of his distinguished career and point to new directions for Japanese studies.

Uneven Moments begins with reflections on area studies as an academic field and how we go about studying a region. It then moves into discussions of key topics in modern Japanese history. Harootunian considers Japan’s fateful encounter with capitalist modernity and the implications of uneven development, examining the combinations of older practices with new demands that characterized the twentieth century. The book examines the making of modern Japan, the transformations of everyday life, and the collision between the production of forms of cultural expression and new political possibilities. Finally, Harootunian analyzes Japanese political identity and its forms of reckoning with the past. Exploring the shifting relationship among culture, the making of meaning, and politics in rich reflections on Marxism and critical theory, Uneven Moments presents Harootunian’s intellectual trajectory and in so doing offers a unique assessment of Japanese history.

https://cup.columbia.edu/book/uneven-moments/9780231190213

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Call for Applicants: Kuzushiji Summer Workshop

The Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Chicago invites applicants to its annual Kuzushiji Summer Workshop, which offers advanced undergraduates, graduate students, faculty, and independent scholar intensive week-long instruction in reading print and manuscript materials from the Tokugawa and early Meiji periods. This year’s workshop will meet from June 17-21 and conclude with an informal symposium on June 22nd.

The workshop has two tracks. The introductory level, led by Dr. Nobuko Toyosawa (PhD, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), meets for the first three days of the workshop, after which participants can join the intermediate/advanced group. This year’s instructor for the intermediate/advanced group will be Prof. Fujikata Hiroyuki of Tohoku University’s Northeast Asia Center (http://www.cneas.tohoku.ac.jp/e_data/staff/fujikata/fujikata.html).

The workshop will be conducted in Japanese and participants should have familiarity with bungo and hentaigana. There is a $100.00 program fee, which covers the cost of lunches and materials. Participants are responsible for their own travel and housing expenses, but there are limited funds available for those coming from institutions unable to provide support. For information and to apply, please see: https://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/kuzushiji/.

Questions can be directed to Professor Susan Burns at slburns@uchicago.edu.

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Call for Applicants: 2019 Kambun Workshop at USC

2019 Kambun Workshop at USC: Fujiwara Yorinaga in His Own Words

This summer’s Kambun Workshop at the University of Southern California will focus on reading selections from the late Heian Taiki courtier journal of Fujiwara Yorinaga (1120-56), son of the viceroy Tadazane.Yorinaga’s leadership at court was a significant factor in the Hôgen rebellion of 1156. Some documentary materials related to the journal will be read as well, according to interests of members of the Workshop.

A specialist whose work on the journal is well know, Professor Yosuke Onoe of the University of Tokyo Historiographical Institute, will lead this summer’s workshop with Professor Joan Piggott of the USC Project for Premodern Japan Studies (PPJS). Participants will need to have had at least an introductory course in Kambun. The workshop will be conducted in Japanese. Dates for the month-long program are July 15 to August 9. Housing in a USC campus apartment will be available. Please see the PPJS website for more details and an application form. Costs for tuition and housing will be $3210. Some financial support will be available. Questions can be directed to Professor Piggott at <joanrp@usc.edu>.

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Call for Applicants: Traditional Theater Training, Kyoto

Come spend a few weeks in Kyoto this summer to train with masters of traditional theater and dance! This summer will be the 35th annual Traditional Theater Training (T.T.T.) 2019, held at the Kyoto Art Center.

T.T.T. is a three-week summer intensive training program that introduces the traditional arts of nō, kyōgen, and Nihon buyō. There is also an optional kotsuzumi (noh shoulder drum) course open to those interested. The program is based on the practice-recital approach, and aims to allow participants to learn the skills and spirit of traditional performing arts. Each year, we welcome around 24 students, professional performing artists, and academics from at least ten countries, including Japan.

This year’s program will take place from July 17th to August 10th. We will begin accepting applications shortly, through April 30th, 2018. Applicants will be notified of the results no later than the end of May (those requiring letters of invitation/support to help secure funding should contact Matt Shores (mwshores.com) directly).

The instructors will be Katayama Shingo, Tamoi Hiromichi, and Oe Nobuyuki (nō); Shigeyama Akira, Maruishi Yasushi, and Shigeyama Sennojō III (kyōgen); and Wakayagi Yayoi and pupils (Nihon buyō). Fluency in Japanese is not required of participants, though lessons will typically be given in the language (with interpreters on hand). Our final recital will be held in Japan’s oldest commerical family noh theater, participants professionally dressed.

For application forms or more information, contact Kyoto Art Center (in Japanese or English) at t.t.t@kac.or.jp, or contact Shores directly. You may also call +81 (0)75-213-1000 or visit the KAC website at http://www.kac.or.jp/eng/

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Japanese Studies Summer Programmes at the UEA, UK

Japan Orientation, 29 June – 13 July 2019

Level: Undergraduate

Eligibility: The course is suited to those who are interested in Japan, East Asia and the latest approaches to Japanese Studies. No specific prior knowledge is required, except a desire and willingness to learn and engage.

Description:

The significance of Japan today is based upon a fascinating past which informs the present in a multitude of ways. Japan is at the forefront of issues challenging human society in the 21st century, from demographics to sustainable development, and the impact of new technologies and advances in communication. The course draws upon the Centre’s dedication to producing excellent interdisciplinary research on Japan and provides an introduction to generating a deeper understanding of the past, present and future of Japan. Delivery will focus on stimulating discussion with contributions from a number of programme speakers who are leading researchers in the field of Japanese Studies. Day trips to London and Cambridge to visit cultural sites such as the British Museum and the Cambridge University Library. There is also likely to be some time spent off campus in Norwich at the Sainsbury’s Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures.

This course is delivered by Centre for Japanese Studies, in partnership with the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures.

Funding: The Toshiba International Foundation (TIFO) is supporting funded places to applicants from Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech-Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia. Once you have completed your Summer Study at UEA application form, you will be sent a link to submit your supporting statement. There are a small number of additional bursaries available for students from other countries provided by the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures.

For more information and to apply see: www.uea.ac.uk/summerstudyabroad/japanorientation  

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Ishibashi Foundation Summer Fellowship, 27 July – 17 August 2019

Level: Postgraduate

Eligibility: The course is suited to those who are interested in Japan, East Asia and the latest debates in Japanese arts, cultures and heritage. No specific prior knowledge is required except a strong desire and willingness to learn and engage.

Description:

The Centre for Japanese Studies at the Interdisciplinary Institute for the Humanities invites applications for an intensive three-week postgraduate level programme in Japanese Arts and Cultural Heritage. With the support of the Ishibashi Foundation we offer full bursaries to successful applicants accepted on to the course. The bursary covers tuition, accommodation, breakfast and lunch on working days, study trips and a contribution towards travel costs. Applications are invited from any country from advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students with a demonstrable interest in the field.

Classes will take place on the UEA campus, home to the renowned Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, and at the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures in the historic centre of the city of Norwich. Taught by leading specialists in the field, this programme offers an exceptional opportunity for students to develop an in-depth appreciation and understanding of Japanese arts and cultural heritage. Field trips will include visits to major museums with Japanese collections and significant cultural heritage sites in London and Norfolk.

Funding: The Ishibashi Foundation is supporting a number of funded places for the Ishibashi Foundation Summer Fellowship at UEA. Once you have completed your Summer Study at UEA application form, you will be sent a link to submit your supporting statement.

For more information and to apply see: www.uea.ac.uk/summerstudyabroad/ishibashi

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